Carol Tuck: Racing Against Time, and South Africa's Assisted Dying Law ~ Kim Cloete
 
 
 
 
Carol_Tuck

Carol Tuck: Racing Against Time, and South Africa's Assisted Dying Law October 28, 2016
Death was the undercurrent in South Africa from 1948 to 1994, when the government aggressively enforced the policy of apartheid--separate accommodations for blacks and whites. So it’s interesting that in 2016, a different discussion can be heard. About whether or not a person can ask a doctor for direct help in dying. This week, we’ll hear about how that debate is unfolding in South Africa, through the experience of a man who specializes in medical ethics, and a doctor who practices palliative care--the relief of pain.

We begin with the story of Carol Tuck, a resident of South Africa's eastern coast. She was diagnosed with colon cancer at 37. Now in stage four, she has reached the end of her treatment options. And she's hoping to leave this world on her own terms, with doctor-assisted dying. The practice is illegal, but that could change after November 4th, when an appellate court re-examines the law. Reporter Kim Cloete brings us her story.